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Learning Behaviors

Learned actions that enable students to access learning and interact with others productively in the community.

Learning Behaviors are learned actions that enable students to access learning and interact with others productively in the community. These behaviors are developed in and outside of school.

Additionally, Learning Behaviors help with understanding and managing emotions, establishing and maintaining positive relationships, and making responsible decisions are essential life skills. They complement the curriculum content taught in the elementary grades and are a natural part of learning about oneself while interacting with others.

These behaviors were drafted and revised several times based on feedback from teachers, administrators, curriculum staff, and parent advisory committees.

Report Card Language and Indicators

Indicators are provided to give greater detail about each learning behavior. These indicators give students, families, and teachers a sense of what the learning behavior means or how it might be demonstrated. The indicators help guide teachers as they consider and report on the learning behavior. The indicators are not a checklist. All indicators do not have to be present to meet expectations of the learning behavior. There are five learning behaviors reported on the elementary report card:

Demonstrates Interpersonal Skills

  • Shows respect to peers and adults
  • Interacts positively with peers and adults
  • Shares opinions respectfully
  • Contributes positively to the classroom and school community
  • Demonstrates digital citizenship

Demonstrates Responsibility

  • Follows established schoolwide and classroom procedures
  • Follows oral and written directions
  • Exhibits self-control and manages emotions
  • Participates actively in learning
  • Manages time effectively to complete work
  • Organizes and manages materials
  • Accepts responsibility for actions

Demonstrates Perseverance

  • Works through challenges
  • Attempts new strategies when needed
  • Solves problems
  • Asks questions and seeks information
  • Accepts and learns from feedback
  • Demonstrates stamina

Demonstrates Collaboration

  • Works cooperatively in a variety of settings
    (e.g. whole group, small group, online, guided, and unguided)
  • Thinks flexibly
  • Acknowledge others’ ideas
  • Demonstrates ability to reach compromise
  • Shares responsibility
  • Contributes to conversations and group discussions

Demonstrates Initiative

  • Takes appropriate academic risks
  • Begins task without prompting
  • Demonstrates self-advocacy
  • Uses technology to demonstrate learning
  • Selects appropriate tool(s) for the task
  • Seeks to improve work

What are grade/age appropriate examples of learning behaviors?

The five learning behaviors appear in each elementary grade. Yet, each behavior can look a little different based on the grade and age of the student.

The examples listed in the chart below offer ideas about what each learning behavior may be demonstrated differently in different grade levels. Elements of learning behaviors are interconnected. Because of that, there may be some overlap.

For example, “waits for turn to talk” is an example of an interpersonal skill as it is something we do to build rapport with others. Waiting for one’s turn and not calling out might also be an example of demonstrating responsibility as well.

Examples presented below are not necessarily exclusive. Also note that learning behaviors develop over time relative to a variety of factors including instruction, reinforcement, opportunity to practice, and maturation. Some examples naturally appear in two adjacent grade levels. The examples, like the indicators mentioned above, are not a checklist.

Each example does not have to be present for a student to meet expectations.

Show Examples

Learning Behavior PreK (3) PreK (4) Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade
Demonstrates Interpersonal Skills
  • Attends to what the teacher is saying.
  • Student addresses others by name.
  • Engages with peers in cooperative play.
  • Attends to what the teacher and other students are saying.
  • Student addresses others by name.
  • Engages with peers in cooperative play.
  • Student addresses others by name.
  • Attends fully to what the teacher and other students are saying.
  • Student waits for others to finish before talking.
  • Student waits for others to finish talking.
  • Student addresses others by name.
  • Respects personal space of others.
  • Shares and listens to opinions.
  • Respects personal space of others.
  • Respects personal space of others.
  • Accepts differences of opinions.
  • Uses conflict resolution by asking nicely, ignores distractions, gets a teacher.
  • Respects personal space of others.
  • Accepts differences of opinions.
  • Uses conflict resolution by asking nicely, ignores distractions, gets a teacher.
  • Respects personal space of others.
  • Accepts differences of opinions.
Demonstrates Responsibility
  • Often follows established rules.
  • Begins to help with cleanup after activities.
  • Follows established routines and procedures.
  • Contributes to classroom cleanup after activities.
  • Begins to demonstrate appropriate use of classroom materials with modeling.
  • Follows established routines and procedures.
  • Unpacks and cleans up materials when directed.
  • Student stops an activity and transitions to a less desirable activity.
  • Follows established routines and procedures.
  • Engages in classroom activities.
  • Remains focused on tasks.
  • Puts materials in designated places.
  • Follows directions to complete a task.
  • Uses personal and school supplies in a respectful manner.
  • Uses time cues or teacher prompts to pace work.
  • Respects shared spaces and materials.
  • Follows directions.
  • Waits for their turn to speak.
  • Uses agenda book.
  • Can find things in their desk or bookbag.
  • Is prepared for class (brings materials to class, can locate materials)
  • Reviews work before submitting.
  • Follows established procedures and directions.
  • Is prepared for class (brings materials to class, can locate materials)
  • Uses agenda book to record homework.
  • Reviews work before submitting.
  • Follows established procedures and directions.
Demonstrates Perseverance
  • Remains on task for short periods of time. (circle time, washes hands, etc)
  • Responds to prompts.
  • Behaves appropriately for brief periods (circle time, washes hands, etc)
  • Responds to prompts.
  • Attempts new things.
  • Seeks help when needed.
  • Attempts new things.
  • Accepts mistakes and feedback.
  • Sustains attention and age-appropriate stamina.
  • Maintains composure when making a mistake.
  • Considers another strategy when a first is unsuccessful.
  • Attempts new things.
  • Maintains composure when making a mistake.
  • Considers another strategy when a first is unsuccessful.
  • Reacts calmly to setbacks when working on an activity.
  • Sticks with assignments when working independently.
  • Attempts different strategies when a first or second attempt doesn’t work.
  • Asks clarifying questions.
  • Does not give up when working on a challenging learning experience.
  • Determines when a clarifying question is needed.
  • Uses resources to help complete a task.
  • Attempts different strategies when a first or second attempt doesn’t work.
  • Attempts different strategies when a first or second attempt doesn’t work.
  • Reacts calmly to setbacks when working on an activity.
  • Determines when a clarifying question is needed.
  • Uses resources to get “unstuck.”
  • Uses feedback from teacher and peers.
Demonstrates Collaboration
  • Begins to use share materials and equipment with other children.
  • Offers basic help.
  • Shares materials and equipment with other children.
  • Offers basic help.
  • Shares instructional materials and equipment with other children.
  • Contributes to class discussions.
  • Begins to recognize that others have different points of view.
  • Contributes to small group discussions.
  • Respectfully disagrees.
  • Takes turns.
  • Listens to others’ ideas.
  • Asks questions about others’ ideas.
  • Shares learning materials.
  • Asks questions about others’ ideas.
  • Shares learning materials.
  • Compromises with others.
  • Listens to others.
  • Plays an active role in a group.
  • Compromises with others.
  • Listens to others.
  • Plays an active role in a group.
Demonstrates Initiative
  • Begins to clean up materials with prompting.
  • Begins to clean up materials with prompting.
  • Requires less support or guidance from an adult once routines or directions are established and reinforced.
  • Begins work without additional prompting.
  • Uses words to express emotions and wants.
  • Shows interest in a particular topic by gathering information from peers, adults, books, and other sources.
  • Shares ideas that are on topic.
  • Begins work without additional prompting.
  • Uses classroom resources to complete a task (word walls, number charts, other tools).
  • Identifies a problem (“I can’t see the board”) and attempts to solve it.
  • Completes established classroom routines before or when signaled (turning in work, cleaning up)
  • Completes established classroom routines before or when signaled (turning in work, cleaning up)
  • Identifies a problem (“I can’t see the board) and attempts to solve it.
  • Asks clarifying questions when unsure of direction.
  • Starts work in a timely fashion.
  • Attempts to solve challenges appropriately.
  • Asks clarifying questions when unsure of direction.
  • Starts work in a timely fashion.
  • Attempts to solve challenges appropriately.

How are learning behaviors taught/reinforced?

Learning behaviors are naturally taught and reinforced throughout the school year. They are developed and reinforced at school and at home. At school, there are lessons or instructional activities to develop students’ understanding of the behaviors and practice them in authentic settings. Teachers also model and reinforce learning behaviors during daily activities. Some specific connections to learning behaviors during instruction include:

  • Teachers and students develop class rules and agreements in the beginning of the year and revisit as appropriate.
  • Lessons for community, identity, and norms are taught during the year.
  • Teachers consistently hold community circles to discuss interactions, thoughts, and feelings.
  • Social Emotional Learning (SEL) instruction is part of the Health curriculum.
  • Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is leveraged to acknowledge and reinforce learning behaviors.
  • In addition to intentional lessons, teachers reinforce learning behaviors throughout the day by modeling them and reminding students of them before they play a game, work in small groups, or participate in a class discussion.
  • Learning behaviors are also reinforced during recess, lunch, and other school-related activities such as assemblies.

How are learning behaviors evaluated?

Teachers have (received professional learning) been trained to understand and recognize actions that are evidence of the learning behaviors.
Teachers observe students during instruction (and student interaction) to inform their report of the learning behaviors on the report card.
Teachers refer to expectations for a learning behavior.
Expectations are based on frequency and quality.

Frequency: How often a behavior occurs

Teachers consider how frequently the learning behavior is demonstrated by the student. Frequency is thought of as most of the time, some of the time, or not very often or not at all. Frequency is relative to grade-level and age appropriateness.

Quality: How well a behavior is demonstrated (based on grade/age appropriateness).

Teachers consider how well (quality) a learning behavior is demonstrated. This is relative to grade-level and age appropriateness. For example, a younger student may not be expected to persevere with a problem as long as an older student.

How are learning behaviors reported?

  • Each teacher reports performance for the students that they teach.
  • Teachers use the reporting codes below to express student performance.
    • 1 – Meets Expectations
    • 2 – Making Progress Towards Expectations
    • 3 – Limited/No Progress Towards Expectations